Curriculum Reflections

Thoughts on Learning & Innovation in Education

PBL Entry Events

My favorite description of project-based learning comes from Heather Wolpert-Gawron’s elevator pitch in her article “What the Heck is Project-Based Learning?” “PBL is the act of learning through identifying a real-world problem and developing its solution. Kids show what they... Continue Reading →

Collider: Expeditionary Learning

Last Friday Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, the research and design arm of Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, hosted Collider, an innovative professional learning event. To continue to further the mission and vision for our School, Blair Peterson (@eijunkie) and I... Continue Reading →

Learning Walk

Today is Learning Walk day! I wonder what questions students will ask? I wonder if we will see a PBL unit in action? I wonder if all the classes will be taught inside, or if we will find some learners... Continue Reading →

#readworthy (weekly)

A Curiosity Expedition for Lower School Faculty at #MVPSchool (with images, tweets) · JimTiffinJr · Storify tags: #readworthy Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Learning Walk K-4

Learning Walks are powerful elements of professional learning where we learn from the experience, practice, and expertise of our colleagues. While spending 3-5 minutes in each classroom along the way, we can encounter best ideas, strategies, and inspiration from our peers to implement ourselves.


amy-kilbridge-quoteOne of the keys to success as an educator is learning how to steal great ideas.  The best way to steal great ideas is to go on on a learning walk.  For the record, of course I am not talking about the unethical practice of taking from others.  When you allow yourself time and the freedom to wander around the school and witness the works of others it can be an enlightening experience.  

Yesterday I was given the opportunity to visit every K-4 classroom at MVPS with Nicole Martin.  We held ourselves to a quick pace and caught a glimmer of each classroom.  So this was not an in depth analysis of educational practice but it was very insightful.  During one class we saw students working independently, exploring various way to learn and practice math.  This reminded me that students need to have choice in how they learning.  In…

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#readworthy (weekly)

How Can We Teach Math To Encourage ‘Patient Problem Solving’? | MindShift | KQED News tags: #readworthy Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Ask Great Questions

This is a #mustread on student questioning.

sonya terborg

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I seem to write a lot about questions. The more I look into them, the more I see the massive potential they have to revolutionize the way we teach and the way students learn.

In preparing to share some ideas on questions at our faculty meeting, I came across an article about questions.  The article reflected on the results of a study in which they found that mothers are the people in the world who are asked the most questions each day.  And that the most inquisitive of question askers are four year old girls, who seek answers to an incredible 390 questions per day – averaging a question every 1 minute 56 seconds of their waking day.

I began the meeting by sharing the five most difficult questions kids ask – an interesting mix of curiosities (check out the presentation to see them).

All this was to lead into…

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Learning Demands Flexible and Interactive Spaces

Last week I spent a day shadowing students through their day to experience a true day in the life of a fourth grader. While there were many exceptional learning experiences, one that was eye-opening for me occurred during an iDesign DEEP discovery phase,... Continue Reading →

Kindergarteners Go Deep in Weather Learning

Today I was invited to witness collaboration and solution seeking in action. Kindergarten students created Weather Rocks during Maker Class with @jimtiffinjr to complement their Weather Unit. Several students showed me their weather rocks and were able to explain what they... Continue Reading →

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